mummy

   A word used by young children to their mother. Boys usually stop using this form by the age of twelve or so, though usage varies with each family. Girls, especially middle-class girls, are likely to continue using it much longer. Examples of usage occur, e.g., in Anglo-Saxon Attitudes, by Angus Wilson; The Half Hunter, by John Sherwood; The Limits of Love, by Frederic Raphael; The Liberty Man, by Gillian Freeman; Unconditional Surrender, by Evelyn Waugh; Under the Volcano, by Malcolm Lowry. The word is sometimes extended to ‘Mummykins’, ‘Mummy dear’, ‘Mummy pet’, etc. Rudyard Kipling’s story The Gardener is about a boy being brought up by a woman he calls Auntie. He asks why he can’t call her Mummy. She says he might do so ‘at bed-time, for a pet-name between themselves’. The end of the story reveals that she is his true mother anyway.
   The Actor, by Horace Annesley Vachell, has a woman saying to a man: ‘You are such a baby.’ This causes him to make fun of her by calling her Mummy Mirabel (her name). ‘Rummy mummy I am.’ she comments. There is another instance of this assumed maternal role in Georgy Girl, by Margaret Forster. Two young women friends have just come in from the rain. ‘I’ve made a mess,’ one of them says. ‘You have that/ says the other, ‘go and take your mac off at once, do you hear?’ ‘Yes, mummy,’ says her friend, obediently. The variant spelling ‘Mumee’ occurs in Thursday Afternoons, by Monica Dickens, indicating the exasperated pronunciation of the word by an adolescent girl.

A dictionary of epithets and terms of address . . 2015.

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  • Mummy — Mum my (m[u^]m m[y^]), n.; pl. {Mummies} (m[u^]m m[i^]z). [F. momie; cf. Sp. & Pg. momia, It. mummia; all fr. Per. m[=u]miy[=a], fr. m[=u]m wax.] 1. A dead body embalmed and dried after the manner of the ancient Egyptians; also, a body preserved …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mummy & Me — Directed by Jithu Joseph Produced by Jithin Arts Starring …   Wikipedia

  • mummy — mummy1 [mum′ē] n. pl. mummies [Fr momie < ML mumia < Ar mūmiyāʾ, embalmed body, mummy < Pers mum, wax] 1. a dead body preserved by embalming, as by the ancient Egyptians 2. any dead body that has been naturally well preserved 3. any thin …   English World dictionary

  • mummy — Ⅰ. mummy [1] ► NOUN (pl. mummies) Brit. informal ▪ one s mother. ORIGIN perhaps an alteration of earlier MAMMY(Cf. ↑M). Ⅱ. mummy [2] ► …   English terms dictionary

  • Mummy — Mum my, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mummied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mummying}.] To embalm; to mummify. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mummy — For other uses, see Mummy (disambiguation). An Egyptian mummy kept in the Vatican Museums. A mummy is a body, human or animal, whose skin and organs have been preserved by either intentional or incidental exposure to chemicals, extreme coldness… …   Wikipedia

  • mummy — mummy1 /mum ee/, n., pl. mummies, v., mummied, mummying. n. 1. the dead body of a human being or animal preserved by the ancient Egyptian process or some similar method of embalming. 2. a dead body dried and preserved by nature. 3. a withered or… …   Universalium

  • mummy — [[t]mʌ̱mi[/t]] mummies 1) N FAMILY Some people, especially young children, call their mother mummy. [BRIT, INFORMAL] I want my mummy... Mummy, I m tired!... Mummy says I can play out in the garden. (in AM, use mommy) 2) N COUNT A mummy is a dead… …   English dictionary

  • mummy — {{11}}mummy (n.1) c.1400, medicine prepared from mummy tissue, from M.L. mumia, from Arabic mumiyah embalmed body, from Pers. mumiya asphalt, from mum wax. Sense of embalmed body first recorded in English 1610s. Mummy wheat (1842) was said to be… …   Etymology dictionary

  • mummy — I. noun (plural mummies) Etymology: Middle English mummie powdered parts of a mummified body used as a drug, from Anglo French mumie, from Medieval Latin mumia mummy, powdered mummy, from Arabic mūmiya bitumen, mummy, from Persian mūm wax Date:… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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